How Do I Learn Best?

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by Dr. Charice Hayes, Founder

Have you or your child(ren) said, “I study, but I just can’t get it” or “I just can’t get what the teacher/professor is saying in the class?”

Perhaps your study habits or class attentiveness is not align with how you absorb certain information. Yes, learning styles can be good. However, a number of techniques maybe better, such as the use of mnemonics. This is can be very complex to teachers. Yes you want to be inclusive of every student. However, every student absorbs information differently. This is the main reason All 4 One Tutoring customizes each clients’ one-on-one tutoring plan, and our tutors are trained on research-based techniques. Feel free to leave a comment.

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Fun, Technology-Based Activities for Your Kids to Do This Winter

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by Laura Pearson, Guess Contributor

Photo via Pixabay

Most kids love spending as much time outdoors as they can, but when winter rolls in, it can be difficult to fit in outside time. The coldest months can also be the most boring for young people, but fortunately there are plenty of online activities for kids that are also educational. Whether your children are interested in art, science, music, math, or reading, there are tons of fun things they can do when the snow begins to fall and they’re stuck inside for awhile.

It’s also important to look for ways your children can stay active when outside time isn’t a possibility, and there are options for that online as well. There are several dance videos, tutorials, and games on the Web that will help your children get up and get moving even when they can’t get active outdoors.

Here are a few of the best sites and apps to try when your child is tired of being stuck inside.

Check out some science projects

There are several ways your child can learn about science online, and many projects that can be completed with simple ingredients you already have at home. Try EarthScienceJr.com, where your kids can learn about how to make “lava” with items from the kitchen.

Learn a new language

Learning a new language can open many doors for your children, and it can help with comprehension in school subjects, as well. Talk to them about which languages they might be interested in learning, and look up some information on the best techniques. Duolingo and Stories by Gus on the Go are widely acknowledged as two of the best language apps for young people; go here for a longer list.

Have a dance party

Get your kids up off the couch by having a dance party that they can move to! There are several dance tutorials on YouTube, or you can look for video games that incorporate movement, such as “Just Dance.” All the music and videos may require a new television or sound system, which can really make a huge difference when it comes to getting your kids motivated to exercise. It’s important not to make any rash decisions, however, so do your research before buying. Click here for more information about home theater systems.

Make it age appropriate

It’s important to make sure your children have age-appropriate content when they use the computer or tablet, and there are some great sites that have a variety of games, videos, and music for all ages. For younger kids, PBSkids.org is a wonderful start because it has tons of fun activities that teach little ones about numbers, words, and colors. Click here to see more learning sites.

Boost confidence

If your children are having trouble with a particular subject in school, you may be able to find a site or an app that will help boost their confidence with it. There are even some that are used in classrooms, so your children can keep up with schoolwork at home and boost their confidence in the subjects that give them trouble.

Many kids these days are plugged in much of the time, whether it’s on a tablet or on the computer, so why not make use of it and help them move ahead? Try a few different sites and apps and help your children find the right ones for their needs this winter.

Bridging the STEM Gender Gap in the Classroom

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by Laura Pearson

@laurapearson1

Despite scoring higher than their male peers in problem solving related to engineering and technology, girls continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields. While this is an issue well beyond the scope of an individual classroom, teachers have an important role to play in balancing the STEM gender gap.

Throughout elementary and high school, girls participate in science and math at approximately the same rate as boys, with some exceptions. While girls are just as likely as boys to take advanced classes in mathematics and chemistry, they’re less likely to enroll in computer science or engineering courses. And that same trend carries over to higher education.

Although the overall statistics look roughly equitable, with women earning 50.3 percent of science and engineering bachelor’s degrees, women’s participation varies significantly across different fields. While women account for more than half of all bachelor’s degrees in the biological sciences, they only receive 17.9 percent of computer science degrees, 19.3 percent of engineering degrees, 39 percent of physical science degrees, and 43.1 percent of mathematics degrees, despite representing nearly 57 percent of all college students.

According to Scholastic, girls’ participation in science starts dropping off in junior high, and the trend continues into high school and college. Since data shows that the difference isn’t in ability, researchers believe there’s something else at play. The National Science Foundation suggests much of the STEM gender gap can be attributed to a sense of belonging; specifically, that a lack of exposure to successful women in STEM causes girls to doubt their own abilities and opt for fields with larger proportions of women instead.

Elementary, middle, and high school teachers play a critical role in keeping girls in STEM.
By intervening before a stereotype threat takes hold, it’s possible to build girls’ confidence and keep them on track toward in-demand careers. Rather than teaching girls in a different way than boys, teachers should craft an approach that makes STEM welcoming and accessible to all. Here are a few ideas to get started:

1. Highlight potential career paths in STEM. Students can’t always connect the schoolwork in front of them to its real-world applications; even if they do understand its value, they likely aren’t aware of the full scope of career options available to them.

2. Incorporate lessons about accomplished female scientists and engineers in curricula. Research shows that exposure to same-gender experts provides girls with a sense of belonging. Rather than restricting lessons to historic women like Marie Curie, discuss women who are making a difference in today’s world.

3. When planning cooperative exercises, distribute class groups to have an equal balance of boys and girls. Assigning at least two girls to a group eliminates the feeling of being outnumbered, which can encourage increased participation.

4. Make sure lesson plans around STEM topics don’t only include stereotypically masculine topics. At the same time, teachers shouldn’t cater exclusively to female students and risk alienating males. Instead, opt for topics with broad appeal and real life relevancy. For example, a lesson plan that bridges a popular career with math, science, English, social studies and home economics skills. For more ideas, try Science Buddies’ topic selection wizard.

Diversity is essential for producing innovation in science and technology. When STEM fields draw upon a broad pool of perspectives and life experiences to solve complex problems, progress is made that much faster. When it comes to girls in STEM, the problem isn’t ability, but rather persistence in a field where they’re the minority. Overcoming the challenges of being a woman in STEM requires girls to feel confident about their place in science and engineering, and teachers are primed to plant those seeds of success.

Image via Unsplash

Why Learning Plans Are Important 

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By Intern 

Learning plans (LPs) are effective ways to monitor progress. They are client/student-centered that focus on learning deficiencies and bridge the gap from deficiencies to efficiencies. 

All 4 One Tutoring gives a diagnostic assessment to clients and develops a learning plan based on the assessment. Clients are consulted on what they need to accomplish to achieve the goal of bridging the gap to from lower skills to higher skills. 

Here is a snapshot of a reading skill learning plan that was developed based on an assessment. 

     
 

What We Use

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Here at All 4 One Tutoring LLC we use Skype to conduct tutoring sessions. Skypeis a freemium voice‑over‑IP service and instant messaging client that is currently developed by the Microsoft Skype Division. Each one of our tutors has their own Skype ID.

In addition, we also use Google Docs. With Google Docs , tutors and clients can share documents online.

Last but not least, we use Idroo. Idroo is an interactive online whiteboard for Skype. It is great to use for math.

Our clients really enjoy the software we use for our online tutoring . Why not schedule a session to experience?

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Adult Education and Family Literacy Week

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Next week is Adult Education and Family Literacy Week. One of the purposes of this week is to celebrate and support adults, who are parents, to obtain the educational skills necessary to become full partners in the educational development of their children.

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