Help Your Child Ease Into the School Year with Confidence

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by Emily Graham, Mighty Moms

Almost one-third of teenagers feel sad or depressed due to stress. School has become more and more nerve-wracking, even for younger children, as the pressure builds from all directions. There are classes, homework, tests, extracurricular activities, and sports, as well as the constant need to be cool and hang out with the right crowd.

Now the first day of school is coming, and that can be downright intimidating, especially if your child already suffers from anxiety. It’s going to take some extra effort on your part to ensure they get through it with as little stress as possible. Here are some tips.

Adopt the Right Attitude

Your goal is to calm them, not deliver lectures when discussing school. In fact, Chris Palmer, the author of Raising Your Kids to Succeed: What Every Parent Should Know, urges you to be caring, empathetic and supportive. Listen to their problems and worries while letting your children find their own solutions. Above all, be sure to show your unconditional love.

Make Sure They Stay Fit

Healthy habits relieve stress, says a wellness coach writing for Verywell Mind. There’s not much time left before summer ends, so get them exercising and eating well so it becomes a routine. Encourage them to work a physical activity they enjoy into their schedule while you plan meals packed with vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein. The last piece of the puzzle is a bedtime routine so they get enough sleep and wake up refreshed.

Get on Track Early

The first hour of the day sets the tone, so establish a morning routine that flows effortlessly from waking up to arriving at school with no hang-ups in between. Preparation starts the night before with packing lunches, laying out clothes, and even making breakfast. That will have the kids well-fed and looking good with no morning rush to set off their nerves.

Buy the Supplies They Need

They’ll struggle with work if they don’t have the right gear to get their homework done easily, and that leads to frustration. Start with the basics like a book bag, paper, pens, and binders before moving on to high-tech items like calculators. Among older students, more and more are carrying laptops to class, which are invaluable when researching and writing papers.

Stay Organized

It’s easy to fall behind with so many projects and papers to finish unless you have a system in place to keep your child up to date. A filing cabinet and labeled bins work wonders, along with Post-It notes to remind them what needs doing and when.

Learn Calming Strategies

Even if your child is prepared for the day, something is likely to get on their nerves, such as a classmate or a tough assignment. There are strategies to cope with this frustration, and using them properly could save a lot of trouble down the road. A writer at The Mighty recommends deep breathing, listening to music, and imagining a calm place to settle their nerves.

Talk to Them About Risks

Dangers lurk in between classes, especially for teens who may encounter classmates who smoke, drink, or use drugs. Your child may be tempted to do the same, either to deal with the pressures of school or just to be cool. Explain how this is never the right way to cope with anxiety, as it could lead to an addiction that ruins their health and their life.

Take It Easy

Classes start easy and get more difficult as the year progresses. This gives your child the opportunity to ease into their studies rather than take off at full throttle. Use this time to your advantage by encouraging good work habits and keeping to a schedule with enough breaks so they don’t get overwhelmed.

Healthy, organized, and informed, your child is ready to tackle the year with gusto. Any lingering anxiety should be manageable by staying positive and sticking to your routine. With a little effort, their school days will be as exciting as they are productive.

Image via Pixabay

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Help Your Child Manage Homework

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The “looming threat” of another year of homework assignments—and potential battles—may overshadow the anticipation of a new school year. But homework routines don’t have to be a painful process, if you and your kids discuss and set the ground rules and expectations early on. Involving your children encourages them to take ownership of their success, too.

With the plethora of distractions to pull a kid’s attention in a million directions once she’s home from school, is it any wonder that — especially after a long day of learning — the last thing she wants to do when she walks in the door is homework? Instead of letting your temper get the better of you, try these suggestions for helping your child tackle homework.

Set the stage

Your children’s ages may determine the best place for them to work. You can easily supervise younger kids when they’re in the kitchen or dining room as you’re prepping dinner. Older kids might prefer to work in their rooms or the den. Decide what works for everyone.

Fill a well-stocked station with typical school supplies. When your kids need a computer, keep it in a central location where you can oversee their work.

Some kids work well listening to music. Others prefer silence. Either works, but keep the homework zone free from other distractions including the television, video games and smartphones or tablets.

Create a routine

You and the kids should decide whether homework’s top priority immediately after school or dinner. Some children need 30 minutes to decompress with a snack. Others want to jump in and finish everything immediately. Your kids’ homework schedules might change depending on the day, if they’re involved in afterschool or evening activities. Just continue to reinforce that homework is a priority.

Strategize

It’s never too soon to teach kids how to plan and strategize. Some kids tackle the hard stuff first. Others prefer to save it for last. Use a calendar to track long-term assignments and decide, with your kiddo, how to chunk projects so they’re not spending six hours working on it the night before it’s due.

Motivating reluctant students

Don’t nag! Creating a negative environment from the outset often backfires. Instead, cultivate a “We’re in this together” approach where you’re available to assist. Be positive. Buy into the assigned work and explain the value of each task.

Teach them to prioritize. Encourage older students with a heavier workload to take regular breaks. Set a timer for 15 – 20 minutes. It’s also never too early to teach your kids how to organize.

Link success to effort. It’s easy to cheer someone on with an “I know you can do it!” attitude, but if you remind her about that ‘A’ she earned after a week of practice, you’ll reinforce a very healthy message that effort and perseverance lead to success.

Know when to call the cavalry. If your child spends what you think is an exorbitant amount of time on homework, or is confused by an assignment, contact her teacher. You also might consider hiring a tutor. Both professionals are trained to handle multiple questions and explain the classwork.

Reaching the finish line

Sometimes, the best way to motivate a child to complete his or her homework is to offer a fun incentive. While some people may worry that offering rewards conditions children to do what’s required or requested only when there’s something in it for them, research disagrees. Using a reward system is not a bribe — and there are a variety of systems to try until you find one that works for your family.

When the weather’s nice, why not incorporate the outdoors into that reward, especially since your kiddo’s probably been sitting inside for most of the day, and studies show that outdoor time is critical to a young person’s development.

Take the whole family on a nature scavenger hunt or go bird watching. Pile onto the bikes and ride to the park to play. Or, if your kids love to learn, check out these fun outdoor learning activities.

Homework is meant to provide reinforcement and extra practice. Set a good example, too, by curling up to read or do your own paperwork during homework time.

Photo Credit: pexels.com

About the Author:

Emily Graham is the creator of mightymoms.net. She believes being a mom is one of the hardest jobs around and wanted to create a support system for moms from all walks of life. On her site, she offers a wide range of info tailored for busy moms — from how to reduce stress to creative ways to spend time together as a family.

Going Over Homework

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by Dr. Charice Hayes, CEO

Over the past few years, we have been asked by potential clients and clients for our tutors to go over homework. Our response to that is that we don’t go over homework, but we provide homework assistance/help. Let’s explain.

-Going over homework does not instill skills for autonomy.

-To promote autonomy, we promote and use effective research-based modeling.

-Once a client displays independence with that skill, he/she will be comfortable with doing his/her own homework assignment.

All of our tutors are trained in research-based techniques. We are in the business of not only improving content/skill level and grades, but character too.

How Do I Learn Best?

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by Dr. Charice Hayes, Founder

Have you or your child(ren) said, “I study, but I just can’t get it” or “I just can’t get what the teacher/professor is saying in the class?”

Perhaps your study habits or class attentiveness is not align with how you absorb certain information. Yes, learning styles can be good. However, a number of techniques maybe better, such as the use of mnemonics. This is can be very complex to teachers. Yes you want to be inclusive of every student. However, every student absorbs information differently. This is the main reason All 4 One Tutoring customizes each clients’ one-on-one tutoring plan, and our tutors are trained on research-based techniques. Feel free to leave a comment.

How EdTech Is Transforming the Remotest Districts

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by Anish Passi, Contributing Author

Education technology, commonly known as Edtech, is a revolutionary progression in the realm of learning and pedagogy. The undeniable skills of teachers and educators in various sectors can now be visited by a student sitting from anywhere in a world! So long as they have accessibility to the internet, nothing can stop these children from growing into their creative and intellectual potential.

Forget about learning through correspondence or swimming rivers across to reach a school, education technology helps you access school and learning in the palm of your hand. With methods like apps and video-calling, companies are using the most appropriate technology to create and promote ethically good learning material. With the help of the best teaching pedagogy from around the globe, its redefining learning using the same classroom approach except in a much more resourceful way. The best bargain through which students gain from the most is that now the remotest of districts can have access to the gem of education that otherwise wouldn’t reach it. Now even resources for competitive exams like IAS are also available online. Transformative practice, indeed!

  • Teachers from all around the world

Giving their audience an exhaustive list of teachers and mentors from different countries and coming from different spheres of education, education technology helps its audience and students to be with the one they connect the most to. Imagine the pure delight that it brings to a district that lacks public schools!

The demands of the society are hard to meet without a technical training or the right subjective knowledge one needs to make a place for themselves. It is indeed a pity that children either have to leave homes or travel a long way if they’re residing in a remote district.

So here’s solace for us all! Now one can easily manage not just work, but their daily dose of lessons to make up for years lost and to come. You wanted one centre with a teacher? Here, the genie lets you pick as many as you want.

  • Everybody is a student

Everyone from any walk of life or financial background can afford an education, it is mostly free of any changes or comes at a very nominal fee as opposed to private institutions. Who knew that the lack of infrastructure or tuition fee could be so beneficial? And you’re not losing the expertise that comes from certified teachers or professors.

This will come a long way in enhancing the life chances and transforming the literacy situation even in the remotest locations across the world.

  • Interactive classrooms

New age education is incomplete without seamless education through interactive classrooms. EdTech has pioneered distance education by providing a borderless system that integrates educators with any interested student.

There is no dearth of resources- all you need is an uninterrupted internet connection. Students are free to take up courses in line with their interests and find relevant courses; sharing a classroom that transcends nationalities. This form of hands-on teaching is also ideal for students looking for additional studying and tutoring to aid their college/school courses.

  • New hope for educators

The biggest benefit has been derived by the various educators and teachers who now have a relevant source of income, especially those with no means to access better jobs due to their location or other restraints. Many students have turned into proficient teachers through EdTech to support their own education as well. It is also a great way to bridge the ever widening gender as well as economic gap.

An interesting thing to note about Edtech is the difference in the business models in Asian and European Markets, keeping in view the various linguistic barriers in the East that are seemingly absent in the West. Education Technology has proved to be a burgeoning market, with start ups sprouting all over the world by the minute owing to the expanding middle class. Digitisation of education has reformed new age learning for all.

However, for it to sustain and grow at the same time, digital literacy should first reach all before digital education. If this perfect integration is attained, the quality of human life will improve exponentially with every passing year.

The State of Charter Schools

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by Dr. Charice Hayes, CEO All 4 One Tutoring

About a month ago, I read a report about how NAACP delegates and the National Board called for a decision to delay the expansion of charter schools. A task force was assembled called the Task Force for Quality Education. The Task Force gathered nationwide data on the state of charter schools and traditional public schools. Here is what the Task Force found:

  • From a Stanford University report, 37% of charter schools performed worse than traditional public schools.
  • Predominate white schools in predominate black communities discipline black students out of the schools.
  • Funds are drained from public schools. The money does not follow the student.
  • A lot of charter schools follow the franchise business model. A board operates the schools under contract, and the teachers are considered at-will employees.

As an organization, All 4 One Tutoring LLC we have tapped into providing services to charter schools. We run a very successful after-school program at the Empowerment Academy in Baltimore, Maryland. We help fill in educational gaps and do activities and projects that help prepare students for college along with helping them have a smooth transition into high school. My take on the report is that I agree that the charter school sector needs to align financial transparency with consistent accountability.

What Are You Going to Do Winter Break?

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by Dr. Charice Hayes, CEO

I’d thought that I should contribute/write the last couple of blog posts of 2017. It’s been an exciting and yet another progressive year for All 4 One Tutoring. I will write about that in our last post of 2017 next week.

Right now, a lot of students (whether college or school-aged) are on winter break. Parents, I’m sure that you have some wonderful activities planned for your child(ren). 🙂 College students, I’m certain that you’re excited about starting the next semester on your journey of earning your college degree in addition to getting a little rest after taking finals. 😌 I’d like to give you some ideas and things you can do over the winter break that will be fun but still incorporate learning.

Well, I think that one of the most important things you can do over the winter break is visit your local public library.

Yes, you can read books there and check audios, books, and DVDs out. However, most public libraries have scheduled engaging activities each month. Some libraries have activities for specific age groups.

I know it’s the holiday season and the malls and stores will have GREAT after Christmas sales. However, use your mall and store trips as a real-life learning experience. Parents of school-aged children, you can create math/story problems in your shopping experience. College students you can create/do something as well. Here are a few examples:

1. Macy’s has a Ralph Lauren shirt on sale for $19.99. You look at the price tag and the shirt was originally $49.99. What is the percent of decrease in the cost of the shirt? (This problem is typically geared toward middle-schoolers.)

2. Macy’s has a Ralph Lauren shirt on sale for $19.99. You look at the price tag and the shirt was originally $49.99. How much money will you save? (This problem is typically geared toward elementary students.)

3. Macy’s is one of your favorite stores, and you want to know why customers buy the things they do. You can research shopping behaviors and understand how products are priced. (This is typically geared toward college students who are majoring in business administration, marketing, fashion merchandising.)

Now, you’ve received all of these nice things for Christmas, and you have to make room for them. You may be getting ready to bring in the new year and want to clean your closet and drawers out. Winter break may be the perfect time to do so. While you’re cleaning out your closets and drawers, think about donating your unwanted items to a charity.

Usually around the holidays and winter break, I see a lot of people at the movie theater. Well why not use this activity as a learning experience? Parents of school-aged children, you can have your child(ren) discuss/write about the setting, the plot, the characters, and what he/she enjoyed the most about the movie.

I know a lot of you have, will receive, or give video game consoles for Christmas. Yes, some of the games are educational and engaging (e.g. Minecraft). However, why not spark some interest in creating your own video game and/or app? This would be an awesome thing to start to think about and begin the planning stages on winter break.

I hope that I’ve really sparked your interest in doing some, if not all, of these activities. You can even take the ideas I’ve given you and cater them to your liking.