How EdTech Is Transforming the Remotest Districts

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by Anish Passi, Contributing Author

Education technology, commonly known as Edtech, is a revolutionary progression in the realm of learning and pedagogy. The undeniable skills of teachers and educators in various sectors can now be visited by a student sitting from anywhere in a world! So long as they have accessibility to the internet, nothing can stop these children from growing into their creative and intellectual potential.

Forget about learning through correspondence or swimming rivers across to reach a school, education technology helps you access school and learning in the palm of your hand. With methods like apps and video-calling, companies are using the most appropriate technology to create and promote ethically good learning material. With the help of the best teaching pedagogy from around the globe, its redefining learning using the same classroom approach except in a much more resourceful way. The best bargain through which students gain from the most is that now the remotest of districts can have access to the gem of education that otherwise wouldn’t reach it. Now even resources for competitive exams like IAS are also available online. Transformative practice, indeed!

  • Teachers from all around the world

Giving their audience an exhaustive list of teachers and mentors from different countries and coming from different spheres of education, education technology helps its audience and students to be with the one they connect the most to. Imagine the pure delight that it brings to a district that lacks public schools!

The demands of the society are hard to meet without a technical training or the right subjective knowledge one needs to make a place for themselves. It is indeed a pity that children either have to leave homes or travel a long way if they’re residing in a remote district.

So here’s solace for us all! Now one can easily manage not just work, but their daily dose of lessons to make up for years lost and to come. You wanted one centre with a teacher? Here, the genie lets you pick as many as you want.

  • Everybody is a student

Everyone from any walk of life or financial background can afford an education, it is mostly free of any changes or comes at a very nominal fee as opposed to private institutions. Who knew that the lack of infrastructure or tuition fee could be so beneficial? And you’re not losing the expertise that comes from certified teachers or professors.

This will come a long way in enhancing the life chances and transforming the literacy situation even in the remotest locations across the world.

  • Interactive classrooms

New age education is incomplete without seamless education through interactive classrooms. EdTech has pioneered distance education by providing a borderless system that integrates educators with any interested student.

There is no dearth of resources- all you need is an uninterrupted internet connection. Students are free to take up courses in line with their interests and find relevant courses; sharing a classroom that transcends nationalities. This form of hands-on teaching is also ideal for students looking for additional studying and tutoring to aid their college/school courses.

  • New hope for educators

The biggest benefit has been derived by the various educators and teachers who now have a relevant source of income, especially those with no means to access better jobs due to their location or other restraints. Many students have turned into proficient teachers through EdTech to support their own education as well. It is also a great way to bridge the ever widening gender as well as economic gap.

An interesting thing to note about Edtech is the difference in the business models in Asian and European Markets, keeping in view the various linguistic barriers in the East that are seemingly absent in the West. Education Technology has proved to be a burgeoning market, with start ups sprouting all over the world by the minute owing to the expanding middle class. Digitisation of education has reformed new age learning for all.

However, for it to sustain and grow at the same time, digital literacy should first reach all before digital education. If this perfect integration is attained, the quality of human life will improve exponentially with every passing year.

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Black History Month- A World Without Black People 

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by intern

Black History Month is a month to celebrate black culture and contributions. We’d would like to share a story that’s been floating around the Internet for quite some time. 

The is a story of a little boy name Theo, who woke up one morning and asked his mother, “Mom, what if there were no Black people in the world?” Well, his mother thought about that for a moment, and then said, “Son, follow me around today and let’s just see what it would be like if there were no Black people in the world.” Mom said, “Now go get dressed, and we will get started.”

Theo ran to his room to put on his clothes and shoes. His mother took one look at him and said, “Theo, where are your shoes? And those clothes are all wrinkled, son. I must iron them.” However, when she reached for the ironing board, it was no longer there.

You see Sarah Boone, a black woman, invented the ironing board, and Jan E. Matzelinger, a black man, invented the shoe lasting machine.

“Oh well,” she said, “please go and do something to your hair.” Theo ran in his room to comb his hair, but the comb was not there. You see, Walter Sammons, a black man, invented the comb.

Theo decided to just brush his hair, but the brush was gone. You see Lydia O. Newman, a black female, invented the brush.

Well, this was a sight: no shoes, wrinkled clothes, hair a mess. Even Mom’s hair, without the hair care inventions of Madam C. Walker, well, you get the picture.

Mom told Theo, “Let’s do our chores around the house and then take a trip to the grocery store.” Theo’s job was to sweep the floor. He swept and swept and swept. When he reached for the dustpan, it was not there. You see, Lloyd P. Ray, a black man, invented the dustpan.

So he swept his pile of dirt over in the corner and left it there. He then decided to mop the floor, but the mop was gone. You see, Thomas W. Stewart, a black man, invented the mop. Theo yelled to his Mom, “Mom, I’m not having any luck.”

“Well, son,” she said, “Let me finish washing these clothes, and we will prepare a list for the grocery store.” When the wash finished, she went to place the clothes in the dryer, but it was not there. You see, George T. Samon, a black man, invented the clothes dryer.

Mom asked Theo to go get a pencil and some paper to prepare their list for the market. So, Theo ran for the paper and pencil but noticed the pencil lead was broken. Well, he was out of luck because John Love, a black man, invented the pencil sharpener.

Mom reached for a pen, but it was not there because William Purvis, a black man, invented the fountain pen.

As a matter of fact, Lee Burridge invented the typewriting machine and W. A. Lovette the advanced printing press. Theo and his mother decided just to head out to the market.

Well, when Theo opened the door, he noticed the grass was as high as he was tall. You see, John Burr, a black man, invented the lawn mower. They made their way over to the car and found that it just wouldn’t go. You see, Richard Spikes, a black man, invented the automatic gearshift, and Joseph Gammel invented the supercharge system for internal combustion engines. They also noticed that the few cars that were moving were running into each other and having wrecks because there were no traffic signals. You see, Garrett A. Morgan, a black man invented the traffic light.

Well, it was getting late, so they walked to the market, got their groceries, and returned home. Just when they were about to put away the milk, eggs, and butter, they noticed the refrigerator was gone. You see John Standard, a black man, invented the refrigerator. So, they just left the food on the counter.

By this time, Theo noticed he was getting mighty cold. Mom went to turn up the heat, and what do you know? Alice Parker, a black female, invented the heating furnace. Even in the summertime, they would have been out of luck because Frederick Jones, a black man, invented the air conditioner.

It was almost time for Theo’s father to arrive home. He usually takes the bus, but there was no bus, because its precursor was the electric trolley, invented by another black man, Elbert R. Robinson.

He usually takes the elevator from his office on the 20th floor, but there was no elevator because Alexander Miles, a black man, invented the elevator.

He also usually dropped off the office mail at a near by mailbox, but it was no longer there because Philip Downing, a black man, invented the letter drop mailbox, and William Barry invented the postmarking and canceling machine.

Theo and his mother sat at the kitchen table with their heads in their hands. When the father arrived, he asked, “Why are you sitting in the dark?” Why? Because Lewis Howard Latimer, a black man, invented the filament within the light bulb.

Theo quickly learned more about what it would be like if there were no black people in the world, especially if he were ever sick and needed blood. Dr. Charles Drew, a black scientist, found a way to preserve and store blood, which led to his starting the world’s first blood bank.

Well, what if a family member had to have heart surgery? This would not have been possible without Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, a black doctor, who performed the first open-heart surgery.

So, if you ever wonder, like Theo, where would we be without black people? Well, it’s pretty plain to see. We would still be in the DARK!